Tidal Power and Migratory Ice in the Minas Region of the Bay of Fundy, Canada

Summary of ice observations years 2006-2011 is published in the Journal of Ocean Technology

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THE VIEW FROM SPACE of the Inter-Tidal Mudflats in the Minas Region of the Bay of Fundy, Where Thousands of 10 to 100 Tonne Cakes of Ice Migrate From the Mudflats into the Tidal Currents Each Winter
PHOTOS: MASSTOWN, Nova Scotia, of Sediment-Laden Ice
PHOTOS: SHUBENACADIE, Nova Scotia, of Sediment-Laden Ice
PHOTOS: MAITLAND, Nova Scotia, of Sediment-Laden Ice
PHOTOS: SUMMERVILLE, Nova Scotia, of Sediment-Laden Ice
PHOTOS: PARRSBORO, Nova Scotia, of Sediment-Laden Ice (Under Construction)
PUBLICATION 2011: SUMMARY OF IMPACT OF ICE ON THE HARVEST OF TIDAL ELECTRICITY IN THE BAY OF FUNDY, CANADA 2006-2011
PUBLICATION 2010: OpEd
2009 TESTING BUOYANCY of Samples of Sediment-Laden Cakes of Ice Grounded on the Inter-Tidal Mudflats of the Minas Region of the Bay of Fundy
PUBLICATION 2008: REVIEW OF EVIDENCE for Sub-Surface Ice in the Bay of Fundy
PUBLICATION 2008: ENGINEERING ISSUES IN THE HARVEST OF TIDAL POWER
PUBLICATION 2007: SUMMARY AND UPDATE of Surface Ice in the Bay of Fundy
PUBLICATION 2006: DOCUMENTATION of Surface Ice in the Bay of Fundy

 

 

Power and Ice 

In the Bay of Fundy, Canada

 

 

 Marine Ice and Other Issues During Harvest of

Tidal Electricity

From Nova Scotia's

Minas Passage in 2011

by

Richard E. Sanders

 Sanders Resource Management, Inc., Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

in

The Journal of Ocean Technology

Volume 6, Number 1, pages 33-55,

(April, 2011)

 

 

 

 

Abstract
While Nova Scotia's Minas Passage is one of the most promising industrial-scale tidal-electricity resources in the world, several marine engineering issues, the most obvious of which are related to the seasonal presence of ice, need to be resolved before this renewable energy resource can be accessed yaear-round.
Prior to the installation of the hundreds of modular tidal electricity harvesting devices planned for this roughly 8 km by 16 km area, engineering strategies need to be developed to:
 
--avoid, minimize or tolerate occasional contact between tidal current harvesting devices and seasonal surface ice and sub-surface masses such as sediment-laden ice cakes, water-logged trees and large marine vertebrates; and
 
--avoid, minimumize or tolerate damage to tidal current harvesting devices and their associated cables from seafloor turbulence such a reciprocating tidal-current-driven sea-bed sediment storms mobilizing mud, silt, sand, cobbels and/or boulders.
 
Obvious prerequisites to the development of engineering strategies for these two issues are studies to quantify the risk of both sub-sruface collisions and seafloor turbulence.  Specifically required are:
 
1. an annual sub-surface census of all macroscopic traffic through the Minas Passage; and
2. a year-long monitoring of seafloor dynamics at all sites where tidal devices and their associated cables are to be located.

Published in Volume 6, No. 1 of the Journal of Ocean Technology, which is accessible here

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